A overview of rehearsing with the book

Share via Email This astonishing debut novel from young New Zealander Eleanor Catton is a cause for surprise and celebration: smart, playful and self-possessed, it has the glitter and mystery of the true literary original.

The luminaries

The novel, which resembles a kind of literary hall of mirrors, suggests that such distinctions are unimportant, that genuine emotion is impossible, and that even the most convincing performances are only copies of copies of reality. The two stories start separately, but inevitably mesh as the book progresses. Meanwhile, in the book's other strand, Stanley enlists at drama school, subjecting himself to the institute's breaking and remaking of its students. There is a tragic but not central death. Through two different time schemes, in fragmentary scenes shuffled together like a pack of playing cards, Catton juxtaposes the aftershocks of an affair between a high-school student and her music teacher with the local drama school's appropriation of the scandal for a theatre project. Was the errant Mr Saladin any worse than the dark and mysterious saxophone teacher whose attempts to control and interfere with her charges appears at times more sinister than Mr Saladin's sexual urges? Hence, it's primarily an exploration of female adolescence and maturity, whatever the sexual orientation. We adopt both a guise and a disguise. The Rehearsal received positive overseas reviews. Among the characters in the foreground: are Isolde; Julia, one of Victoria's classmates; their female saxophone teacher; and Stanley, a young drama student at the Institute by the school. I will be recommending this book to everyone. The first year students are expected to put on a show of their own creation which the instructors are not involved in.

And shocked. Hence, it's primarily an exploration of female adolescence and maturity, whatever the sexual orientation.

the rehearsal sparknotes

Private tuition abounds. Life is a theatre of pretension and cruelty.

The rehearsal eleanor catton pdf

We look hard, so that we can learn. Whether she wins or not, Eleanor Catton is certainly a young novelist to watch out for. It's astounding that The Rehearsal was written by a year-old, though fitting that this talented young writer should evoke so well the charged emotional landscape before adult compromise, when a girl's ambition and desire are not yet "circumscribed by the limits of what she has known, what she has experienced, what she has felt"; when it feels as though anything is possible. The Rehearsal should collapse into a pile of postmodern mush as it starts to revel in its own artifice. Was the errant Mr Saladin any worse than the dark and mysterious saxophone teacher whose attempts to control and interfere with her charges appears at times more sinister than Mr Saladin's sexual urges? They push their daughters from clarinet to saxophone, because it's a "sexier" instrument. The Rehearsal is largely about teenagers trying to establish their identities, trying to figure out who and what they are, and what their place in relation to others is; it is, very much, about trying on roles. That one perfect kiss. Among the characters in the foreground: are Isolde; Julia, one of Victoria's classmates; their female saxophone teacher; and Stanley, a young drama student at the Institute by the school. Technically very accomplished -- the writing is very strong, the presentation, though not straightforward, makes for a novel that feels always simmering -- The Rehearsal is an insightful take on adolescence. To the contrary, The Rehearsal is controlled, elegant and utterly readable, even at its most slippery. Meanwhile, in the book's other strand, Stanley enlists at drama school, subjecting himself to the institute's breaking and remaking of its students. There is a tragic but not central death. Their affair looms over the entire book, but Victoria and especially Mr.

A month into their relationship Stanley is called into the office of the Head of Movement who is told that the saxophone teacher contacted the Institute to complain about Stanley's relationship with Isolde, who is only fifteen.

But I cannot remember when I last enjoyed a first time novel as much as this one. To the contrary, The Rehearsal is controlled, elegant and utterly readable, even at its most slippery.

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The Rehearsal by Eleanor Catton